When Protesting 'destructive' Fishing Practises, Greenpeace Members in The United Kingdom Drop Stones Into the Water.

When Protesting ‘destructive’ Fishing Practises, Greenpeace Members in The United Kingdom Drop Stones Into the Water.

The Portland Limestone Stones Ranged in Weight from 500 to 1,400 Kilos, and They Were Sailed Across the Channel to The Western Part of The Channel Between Britain and France by The Environmental Activists.

On Thursday, the Arctic Sunrise research vessel dropped the massive rocks into the South West Deeps conservation zone, which is located about 190 kilometres from Land’s End, the most westerly point of mainland England.

Large limestone rocks will be placed on the seabed to form a protective underwater barrier, which will make the area off-limits to damaging fishing, as explained on board by oceans activist Anna Diski.

As a result, “they would be unable to pull the heavy fishing gear down the seabed, so ruining the habitat and disrupting the carbon,” she said.

When Protesting 'destructive' Fishing Practises, Greenpeace Members in The United Kingdom Drop Stones Into the Water.

One of the stones was used to make a massive ammonite sculpture, also placed on the ocean floor in homage to the fossil commonly discovered in Portland limestone.

Supporters of the action, including celebrities and politicians, had their names engraved on rocks.

What is our government doing about the commercial fishing frenzy taking place right now in UK waters? asked Will McCallum, oceans campaigner at Greenpeace UK.

This underwater boulder barrier was constructed as a last resort by Greenpeace UK to keep harmful materials out of the waters. We’d prefer it if the government would just do its job.

When Protesting 'destructive' Fishing Practises, Greenpeace Members in The United Kingdom Drop Stones Into the Water.

Bottom-trawlers’ access to the seafloor in marine preserves was called “outrageous” by McCallum. To which he said, “They damage enormous swaths of the marine habitat and make a joke of our so-called ‘protection.

The move comes after the most recent round of United Nations talks to protect marine life in international waters ended in failure.

Fishing gear will not be able to be hauled around the seafloor, according to environmental activists.

In order to stop “destructive” industrial fishing, Greenpeace UK placed 18 big rocks on the seafloor in a marine conservation zone off the coast of southwest England.

The Portland limestone rocks, weighing anything from 500 to 1,400 kilogrammes, were floated across the English Channel to the western part of the channel by the environmental activists (1,100 and 3,100 pounds).
Approximately 190 kilometres (120 miles) off Land’s End, the most westerly point of mainland England, the Arctic Sunrise research vessel dropped the massive rocks on Thursday in a region of the South West Deeps (East) Conservation Zone.

On Friday, Greenpeace argued that the boulders would prevent bottom-towed fishing gear from being dragged down the seafloor, which would be devastating to marine life in the area.

When Protesting 'destructive' Fishing Practises, Greenpeace Members in The United Kingdom Drop Stones Into the Water.

Artists used one of the boulders to create a massive ammonite sculpture, which was placed on the ocean floor in homage to the fossils that can be found in Portland limestone.
“What is our government doing about the industrial fishing frenzy taking place in UK waters right now?” questioned Will McCallum, the head of oceans at Greenpeace UK.

This underwater boulder barrier was constructed as a last resort by Greenpeace UK to keep harmful materials out of the waters. We’d prefer it if the government would just do its job.

Bottom-trawlers’ access to the seafloor in marine preserves was called “outrageous” by McCallum.
They make a mockery of our so-called protection while destroying large portions of the marine ecosystem, he said.

Since the most recent round of United Nations talks to address the issue of protecting marine life in international waters ended with no concrete results, this action is warranted.

South West Deeps is “one of the most frequently fished so-called Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in the UK,” according to Greenpeace. The MPA covers an area of 4,600 square kilometres (1,776 square miles).

When Protesting 'destructive' Fishing Practises, Greenpeace Members in The United Kingdom Drop Stones Into the Water.

Statistics from the watchdog group Global Fishing Watch were mentioned, which showed that 110 fishing vessels, the majority of which were French, spent 18,928 hours fishing in the region between January and July.

For 3,376 of those hours, commercial vessels used bottom-towed fishing gear to haul in fish from the area’s depths.

Bottom-trawling, according to Neil Whitney, an English fisherman from East Sussex, is “like ploughing a combine harvester through a national park.”

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When a fishery collapses due to their actions, “they merely move on to the next one,” he said, emphasising that they are capable of destroying entire ecosystems.
Small-scale UK fishermen like myself are losing out big time because to industrial fishing, which Whitney described as “fly-shooters” (vessels that drag lead-weighted ropes down the seabed) and “super-trawlers” (trawlers longer than 100 metres or 328 feet).

He called the allowance of bottom-trawling in marine protected areas (MPAs) “absurd.”

The goal of marine protected zones is to restore fish populations so future generations can enjoy the sport. “This is just a matter of common sense,” Whitney said.

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